I am currently in a research programme at the Royal College of Art. I was Head of the Art Department and Member of the Director’s Committee @ PlayGround since 2015 until 2019. 






HOT LINKS

︎ Dis/connect
Communication in the Age of Isolation
︎ Metal interview
El Arte de Hackear
︎ Handle with care
Actas BAU Design Forum 2017
︎ On the desk
ADG Laus



THE SKY IS REACHABLE BECAUSE I CAN’T FLY





PROJECT:

BTU / BT Archives


VIDEO
2:28 MIN
COLOR
ENG + ENG SUBTITLES
APR-MAY 2020 
ROYAL COLLEGE OF ART

ALL IMAGES:
LAIA MIRET
MAXAR TECHNOLOGIES
Video piece included in Dis/connect, a collaborative web publication by the MRes Communication Design Pathway at the Royal College of Art, in partnership with the BT Archives. Each piece speculates on the dis/connected future of telecommunications, and each is inspired by an artefact from the archive’s collection. The work was produced during the Covid-19 pandemic.


Capture of a group videocall impersonating our objects, with Parinda Sakdanaraseth and Ming Ling.

Poster of the project, designed by Sun Moon, Yuzhen Kai and Melissa Lu.




I choosed a picture of the Telstar satellite. Here a text extract from the newspapers published the day of launch, the 11th of July of 1962:

[1]
This is Telstar

Telstar, the world’s first broad band active communication satellite, was launched into orbit by the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration from Cape Canaveral the 10 July. It is circling the earth once every 158 minutes at a height of between 600 to 3,500 miles and is mutually visible to the ground stations at Goonhilly and Andover, Maine, for up to some 30 minutes on each of three or four consecutive passes in each 24 hours.

Circular in shape and painted sapphire-blue and silver, Telstar has nearly 15,000 parts stored inside its 34-inch diameter. It draws its power from the 3,600 solar cells on the surface which turn the light of the sun into electrical energy for supplying the electronic equipment in the satellite and picks up the faint signals from the transmitting ground station, amplifies and re-transmits them on another frequency to the receiving ground station. The satellite contains equipment suitable for television picture, or up to some 600 telephone channels.

Telstar was designed by Bell Telephone Laboratories.

[2]
Communication on the Moon

We have looked at TELSTAR in some detail so far as communications on the earth itself are concerned. But sooner or later, man will leave the earth, land on the moon and establish bases there. How will he communicate between bases which are widely separated?

Ordinary radio will be useless – because the moon has no appreciable ionosphere reflecting radio waves. To make matters worse, the moon is very small and its curvature correspondingly great and its horizon very near. The moon is very small and its horizon very near. The moons is so curved that even an aerial as high as the Eiffel Tower would be completely below the horizon at a distance of 20 miles!

(…)

Of course, the earth-moon system is not a mathematically ideal one. But Lagrange’s purely theoretical reasoning might give new leads towards a practical solution.





https://dis-connectfuture.com/